Now It’s Turmeric? How Much Trend Can We Take?

Epicurean Group

turmeric

I recently read Linda Yellin’s piece “When Did Kale Get A Publicist?” in More Magazine and laughed out loud. Well, first I sort of whimpered because More Magazine just started appearing in my mailbox and I couldn’t figure out why until someone told me, not so gently, that it was because I hit the age of 40. They should just call it Forty – just like they call it Seventeen. It’s mean to tease old people.

After overcoming my surprise and stretching my arms reaallllyyy far in front of my face in order to actually read the article, I wanted to be Yellin’s friend, or at least shop and dine with her. She, too, had a childhood that included weekly meatloaf and a mother who didn’t once ask what I’d like for dinner. I had that mother. I am that mother now. Call me vintage, but with four children…

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10 Myths About Writers and Writing

Pilot Fish

In order to write creatively, we need to exercise our free-spirited and impulsive right brain.  It might take a while to “liberate” this side of the brain especially if we have worked in fields that are linear, concrete, and require rationale thought.  This is what happened to me many years ago when I switched from a career in teaching and publishing to full-time writing.   As I began my apprenticeship in the creative arts,  I had to dispel several myths about the writing process and writers.

"Incognito: The Hidden Self-Portrait" by Rachel Perry Welty, DeCordova Museum. “Lost in My Life (Price Tags) ” by Rachel Perry Welty, DeCordova Museum.

1.  Myth: Writers Are Strange.

There is an element of truth to this!  Writers (and other creative people) must be willing to look below the surface of everyday life and explore the world and relationships like a curious outsider.  This perspective sets us apart, but at the same time, it allows us…

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Trapped by Anxiety

Broken Light: A Photography Collective

Photo taken by contributor Samantha Pugsley, a 24-year-old conceptual fine art photographer from Charlotte, North Carolina. She first picked up a camera during her junior year of college. This was right around the time when she was diagnosed with Generalized Anxiety Disorder. Things that were once easy became impossible for her. Getting dressed in the morning, shopping at the grocery story, driving her car…just living, was a panic attack waiting to happen. Photography helped her heal. With her camera she could start a conversation about what was going on in her head. She could say things with her images that she didn’t know how to say out loud. She still struggles with anxiety but making art helps her talk about it and manage it. She started a 365 photography project to ensure that she’d be doing what brings her joy every single day. She has noticed that her anxiety level…

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